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An Introduction to Schema Therapy

This two-day CPD workshop will introduce participants to the theory and skills of Schema Therapy.

Schema Therapy is an integrative approach to treatment that combines the best aspects of cognitive-behavioral, experiential, interpersonal and psychoanalytic therapies into one unified model.

Introduction to Schema Therapy

Course Details

Schema Therapy is an integrative approach to treatment that combines the best aspects of cognitive-behavioral, experiential, interpersonal and psychoanalytic therapies into one unified model. Research has shown that Schema Therapy has shown remarkable results in helping people to change negative ("maladaptive") patterns which they have lived with for a long time, even when other methods and efforts they have tried before have been largely unsuccessful.

 

Although schemas are usually developed early in life (during childhood or adolescence), they can also form later, in adulthood. These schemas are perpetuated behaviourally through the coping styles of schema maintenance, schema avoidance, and schema compensation. The Schema model of treatment is designed to help the person to break these negative patterns of thinking, feeling and behaving, which are often very tenacious, and to develop healthier alternatives to replace them.

 

This workshop will be facilitated by Jean Notaro and Eilish McGuiness, both of whom hold  Advanced Level Accreditation with the International Society of Schema Therapy (ISST).

 

Date: TBC

Venue: TBC

Time: 10.00am - 5.00pm
Award: Attendance Certificate      

 

Fees: Full price: €180
PCI College Student / Graduate: €160

 

Students will learn about the theory and key skills of Schema Therapy and how they can be used in professional practice. The workshop will be highly experiential, with group discussions, role play and work in tryads and dyads.

 

Eligibility:  Qualification in Counselling, Psychotherapy or other helping professionals with therapeutic experience and students currently in professional training (Year 2 onwards). Entry is by application form.

Course Content will include:

  • An Introduction to the theory of Schema Therapy
  • Key skills in Schema Therapy
  • Putting theory into practice in a professional setting

 

About Schema Therapy:

Schema Therapy is an integrative approach to treatment that combines the best aspects of cognitive-behavioral, experiential, interpersonal and psychoanalytic therapies into one unified model. Research has shown that Schema Therapy has shown remarkable results in helping people to change negative ("maladaptive") patterns which they have lived with for a long time, even when other methods and efforts they have tried before have been largely unsuccessful.


ST grew out of Beck’s cognitive therapy, gradually developing into a unique integrative treatment for a spectrum of long-standing emotional/relational difficulties, most notably personality disorders. ST was developed by Young (1990) to address roadblocks to progress encountered when working within the Beckian model with clients suffering from chronic difficulties with mood (e.g., dysthymia) and chronic interpersonal problems (e.g., personality disorders). As Young discovered, cognitive therapy with nonresponders and relapse-prone clients required shifting the focus from surface level cognitions or beliefs to deeper constructs—namely, schemas—as central to understanding psychopathology.


Schemas are considered to be enduring foundational mental structures, which go beyond being purely cognitive features of the mind to encompass emotions, bodily sensations, images, and memories. Young (1990) and his colleagues (Young, Klosko, & Weishaar, 2003) proposed a taxonomy of early maladaptive schemas that are thought to emerge when core emotional needs go unmet or are met inappropriately, usually by a child’s caregivers.   These needs (e.g., for safety, security, validation, autonomy, spontaneity, and realistic limits) are seen as universal. In infancy and childhood, meeting these needs falls to the child’s caregivers, and is considered necessary for a child to develop into psychological health as an adult. Young posited that enduring client problems often stem from present-day activation of early maladaptive schemas.  At times, problems directly involve the distress felt when the schemas are activated. Quite often, however, they result from the characteristic behaviors enacted as a response to the schema—which Young referred to as “coping styles.”


Although schemas are usually developed early in life (during childhood or adolescence), they can also form later, in adulthood. These schemas are perpetuated behaviourally through the coping styles of schema maintenance, schema avoidance, and schema compensation. The Schema model of treatment is designed to help the person to break these negative patterns of thinking, feeling and behaving, which are often very tenacious, and to develop healthier alternatives to replace them.





 

What our Students Say

"Enjoyed meeting everybody & hearing their stories, some were very inspiring. Loved getting the chance to spend the day writing. Well worth doing - highly recommend"
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What our Students Say

"It was more than I expected; the teaching was brilliant, very organised, bringing lots of interesting reading and activities".
2012-2013 Student - Postgraduate Certificate in Child and Adolescent Counselling & Psychotherapy
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